Why I Really Like This Book
These are podcasts about forgotten fiction, for curious readers, and for anyone who likes old books. Sometimes they're stories, sometimes they're not. Most of the authors write in English; and sometimes they don't. But all the books I talk about, I really really like. I hope you will too.
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My name is Kate Macdonald: I'm an English lecturer, and a lifelong browser in second-hand bookshops. I post weekly ten-minute podcasts on a Friday, on the books I really like which I think deserve new readers. You can find out lots more at the Facebook page here, and get these podcasts weekly by subscribing on the iTunes link above.

The music for the podcast intro is by The Tribe Band. Lucy Marsh did the drawing and Matthias Opsomer lettered it. Patrick Belk and Martin Fowler hold my tech safety net.

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Questions? Send me a message by mailing me at kate [dot] brussels [at] yahoo [dot] com.

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Waves, wind, puffins, sheep, tumbled stones, wet grass and rats underfoot in the house when they think they can get away with it. Welcome to the Shiant Isles, which have been sitting between Lewis and mainland Scotland for millennia. The history of these lumps of rock has been put together by Adam Nicolson in Sea-Room, in a tumble of personal story and archaeological finds. Thousands of sea-birds live on the rocks in the summer, no-one lives on the islands in winter except sheep. Fishermen come and go, and the rats keep coming back. The islands mean a great many things to the people who go there, and even more to those who died there. For those who like to read about wild weather and the remoter parts of Britain with their feet dry and the door shut.

Direct download: Adam_Nicolson_and_Sea-Room.mp3
Category:the great outdoors -- posted at: 1:30am CET
Comments[1]

  • I loved it! Thank you so much. Scrupulously accurate in everything you said. And understanding, in a way some don't, of the method the book tries to employ. What a treat for me, currently in Boston, Mass, and rather longing, as you say you are, for OVER THERE. With many thanks and much appreciation, and with all best wishes, Adam (I think you must go there, even for the day...)

    posted by: Adam Nicolson on 2011-10-23 20:13:50

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